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7 TIPS ON HOW TO FOCUS AND WORK IN JFK AIRPORT

WORK WELL ANYWHERE

It’s no secret to the road warrior that business travel can destroy productivity. Even the most seasoned travelers can find themselves struggling to focus in unfamiliar environments like sedan service, the airport terminal, or even the hotel room. When you factor in the inevitable truths that sleep patterns can be significantly disrupted and food eaten on the go isn’t always healthy, you can find yourself tired, stressed, and behind on your to-do list. While executive chauffeured transportation to JFK airport gives you the quiet and wireless access you need to get work done, what can you do if your mind can’t stay on track?

Healthy work habits can also make your life more enjoyable, particularly if you travel frequently for business. According to productivity and happiness expert Niro Thambipillay, “Being productive is using your time to achieve what’s important to you.” If that means being able to work less while knowing you’re still reaching your goals, actively adopting tips for better focus on the road can improve the life of nearly every executive traveler.

1. ASK YOURSELF WHAT YOU CAN NOT DO

When you’re settling down to work in a new or unfamiliar environment, allow your mind to focus in on what you need to accomplish by figuring out what doesn’t need to be done. Have you checked your email recently enough that you can skip your inbox entirely? Are writing reports a lower priority than responding to a client’s question? By determining which tasks are less essential right out of the gate, you can achieve a less frantic state of mind.

2. GROUP EMAIL-CHECKING

By all accounts, spending your day switching screens and checking your email may feel productive, but it really, really isn’t. Replying to emails throughout the day as they’re received may feel productive, but consider the amount of time it takes you to mentally get back on task, particularly if an email was unusually distracting. Set an expectation that you’ll check emails 3 times a day, using an hour or less each time, and stick to it.

3. WORK IN BLOCKS

Approach your to-do list and calendar as an opportunity to set aside time in blocks to work on projects or portions of projects. If your ride from Long Island to JFK airport will take 30 minutes, plan to spend that entire time working on a single task that can be finished in that span of time.

4. STOP MULTI-TASKING. FOREVER.

Multitasking may feel productive, but it simply isn’t. Due to the fact it takes more mental energy to switch back and forth between tasks, even the smartest professionals actually get less done when they multi-task. Resist the temptation to lose focus.

5. SET ATTAINABLE GOALS

Even if you work well under pressure, don’t set the personal expectation that you’ll write a 200-page document during your 30-minute chauffeured transportation ride to JFK. There’s a difference between setting yourself up to exceed expectations and setting yourself up to fail.

6. SET A “SUPER SIX” EACH DAY

Thambipillay recommends having six goals in mind for each workday and setting them up before you reach your desk to work. Why? He writes “when everyone else starts their day, you can begin being productive immediately.” Prepare in advance, whether the prior night or the morning of, so you can hit the ground running as soon as possible.

7. DON’T STAND UP YOUR COMMITMENTS

How often have we told ourselves that emails went unsent and tasks weren’t accomplished because something came up? Treat your commitments like they’re completely mandatory to ensure nothing slides off your plate.

For new executive travelers, it can feel like a mystery how some people can treat nearly any space, from the corner coffee shop to the airport terminal, like their personal office. Productivity and focus during travel are really just a matter of understanding what needs to be done, committing to doing it, and keeping your promises to yourself.

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